You are here: http://www.DAD-opto.de --> home/english --> index --> sample texts --> Light Measurement Essay --> Para. 10


M E A S U R I N G   L I G H T (continued)

10. Key Word Index (S...Z)
--------------------------


In the text of the paragraphs, all keywords are enhanced by using KAPITAL LETTERS.

In the index, all items are sorted "naturally": don't search for "photometer, bunsen", but for "bunsen photometer".


goto letters A...E    goto letters F...L    goto letters M...R    letters S...Z are here.



key word short description paragraph + hyperlink
sb Stilb, seldom used unit for Luminance L;
= 1 cd/cm^2
table 8.2.1 in
8. Comparison Tables
scanning process shifts the measurement aperture in matrix form 4.2.4 Radiance  L
scanning spectroradiometer spectroradiometer that measures one band after another 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
scared (of light measurement) uncomfortable task 1. Goals of this Essay
scatter irregular and stochastic reflection 7.2 Coherence (of Laser Radiation)
sensitivity here: factor between meter reading and optical power 7.3 Power Range (of Laser Radiation)
sensitivity calibration same as amplitude calibration 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
sensor transducer for light signal --> electrical signal 4.1.1 Radiant Flux  (Phi)
skew see "tilt" 4.3.3 Cosine Correction
slit function response of monochromator tuned across single line spectrum 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
solid angle  (Omega) stereoscopic analogy to plane angles 4.2.2 Solid Angle  (Omega)
solid angle  (Omega) stereoscopic analogy to plane angles 4.2.3 Radiant Intensity  I
source size limit allowable maximim size for treating like point source 6.1 Point Source and Distance
source's structure local variations of light emitting properties 5.2.3 Luminance  L
spatial distribution how some property is locally structured 5.2.3 Luminance  L
spatial flux density (luminous flux per receiving area:) 5.3.1 Illuminance  E
spatial flux density flux per area of bundle cross-section 4.3.1 Irradiance  E
spatially resolved showing how a value is depending upon angle, displacement,... 4.2.1 Radiant Exitance  M
speckles stochastic interference pattern 7.2 Coherence (of Laser Radiation)
spectral luminous efficiency relative human eye spectral sensitivity characteristics  V[(lambda)] 4.4.3-Example
5.0 Photometry, general
spectral resolution here: replacing one broad-band measurement
by many narrow-band ones
4.4.1 Why use Spectral Resolution?
spectroradiometer measuring radiometric units on a by-wavelength basis 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
spectrum information vector of successive wavelenghts, associated with a
vector of spectral values
4.4.3 Applying Spectral Resolution
spike and notch discontinuities in e.g. spectral characteristics 4.4.3 Applying Spectral Resolution
sr steradian, pseudo-unit for solid angle  (Omega) 4.2.2 Solid Angle  (Omega)
standard candle precursor of SI-unit 'candela' 5.0 Photometry, General
standard meter object for calibrating all meter rules 2. Introduction
steradian pseudo-unit for solid angle  (Omega) 4.2.2 Solid Angle  (Omega)
Stilb seldom used unit for Luminance  L
= 1 cd/cm^2
table 8.2.1 in
8. Comparison Tables
stray light (monochromator) performance parameter of monochromator 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
structured light source source with lighter and darker portions 4.2.1 Radiant Exitance  M
structured light source source with lighter and darker portions 4.2.4 Radiance  L
substitute instrumentation instrument that is usable though not specialized for the task 4.3.1 Irradiance  E
substitute instrumentation instrument that is usable though not specialized for the task 4.3.2 Radiant Exposure  H
substitute instrumentation instrument that is usable though not specialized for the task 5.3.2 Exposure  H
table of spectral values table form of spectral characteristics curve 4.4.3-Example
Talbot seldom used unit for Exposure  H 5.3.2 Exposure  H
tilt a plane's deviation from position normal to light ray 4.3.3 Cosine Correction
topics of the essay the facts it describes and the results it strives for 1. Goals of this Essay
transform radio-/photometry by weighting and integrating spectral characteristics 5.0 Photometry, General
transient light light that varies fast, but only once 5.1.2 Luminous Energy  Q
transient radiation radiation that varies fast, but only once 4.1.2 Radiant Energy  Q
tubular incandescent lamp lamp with filament in cylindrical tube 6.2 Line Source and Distance
ulbricht sphere = integrating sphere 4.2.1 Radiant Exitance  M
underfilled aperture bundle cross-sectional figure smaller than detector aperture 4.1.1 Radiant Flux  (Phi)
underfilled aperture bundle cross-sectional figure smaller than detector aperture 5.1.1 Luminous Flux  (Phi)
unit quantities consist of numeric value times unit name 8. Comparison Tables
usual error error of normal radiometers 4.2.4 Radiance  L
V(lambda) = spectral luminous efficiency (eye spectral sensitivity) 4.4.3-Example
5.0 Photometry, general
V(lambda)-corrected detector detector that spectrally emulates the human eye 7.1 Monochromatism (of Laser Radiation)
W Watt, SI unit for radiant flux 2. Introduction
W Watt, SI unit for radiant flux 4.1.1 Radiant Flux  (Phi)
W Watt, SI unit for radiant flux table 8.1 in
8. Comparison Tables
W/sr = Watt per Steradian, SI unit of radiant intensity 4.2.3 Radiant Intensity  I
Watt SI unit for radiant flux 2. Introduction
Watt SI unit for radiant flux 4.1.1 Radiant Flux  (Phi)
Watt SI unit for radiant flux table 8.1 in
8. Comparison Tables
Watt per square-meter SI unit for radiant exitance and for irradiance 4.2.1 Radiant Exitance  M
Watt per square-meter SI unit for radiant exitance and for irradiance 4.3.1 Irradiance  E
Watt per Steradian SI unit for radiant intensity  I 4.2.3 Radiant Intensity  I
Watt-Second SI unit for radiant energy 4.1.2 Radiant Energy  Q
wavelength distance between points of equal phase in a wave 3. What is Light
wavelength calibration comparing spectroradiometer to wavelength standards 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
wavelength limit spectral limit of measurement 4.0 Radiometry/General
wavelength limits spectral limits of measurement 4.4.1 Why use Spectral Resolution?
wavelength resolution discerning small wavelength differences 4.4.2 Instruments (for spectral. resolv. meas.)
waving figure stereoscopically formed by a line which is pinned down to one point 4.2.2 Solid Angle  (Omega)
weighting multiply e.g. spectr. characteristics of source with those of filter 4.4.3 Applying Spectral Resolution
weighting multiply e.g. spectr. characteristics of source with those of filter 4.4.3-Example
white frame entire frame signal, collected in uniform illumination 4.2.4 Radiance  L
wide solid angle here: light incident from a wide range of angles 4.3.3 Cosine Correction
wide-spread use (of illuminance meters) enhancing availability of illuminance meters 5.3.1 Illuminance  E



goto letters A...E    goto letters F...L    goto letters M...R    letters S...Z are here.

Contents of entire essay

Contents of entire web site


Last modified April 29th 2004 23:44